Our Neighborhood's Biodiversity Map

* Please click the continent to see the endangered species of our neighborhood.
North America
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Shared by : Aaditya Singh (Austria), Sumit Chowdhury (Bangladesh), Dewi R. Sulistyoningrum (Indonesia)
Habitat : : North America- Canada, Alpine mountainous regions of Vancouver Island, Columbia
Status : Critically Endangered
About
The Vancouver marmot (Marmota vancouverensis) is a critically endangered species of marmot inhabiting the open alpine habitat in the mountainous regions of Vancouver Island in the Canadian province of British Columbia. Vancouver marmot is distinguished from other marmots by its chocolate-brown fur with white patches. This species lives in subalpine meadows between 900 to 1,400 meters in elevation. This marmot also lives in colonies made up of 1 to 3 families. An adult one is typically 56 to 70 centimeters in length and weight around 3 to over 7 kg. They mainly eat grasses and sedges in spring and forbs in summers aside of small fruits. They hibernate from late September or early October to early May.
Habitat loss due to changing climate is one of the primary reasons held responsible for a decline in the population of this species. With the loss of open alpine landscapes under the influence of warmer temperatures, the survival rates and reproductive patterns of these marmots are being affected adversely. In 2003, the Vancouver marmot population plummeted down to an ever low of only 30 individuals. Realizing the urgency of the situation, the conservation authorities of the country decided to capture wild animals and breed them in captivity to increase their numbers. A large number of animals were thus shifted to Toronto Zoo, Vancouver Zoo, and other facilities within the country for captive breeding. The success of this program led to the increase in the wild marmot population to about 250 to 300.
Threats
Primary threats to this species are invasive species or predation, ecosystem change and climate change.
Major predator to this species includes golden eagles, cougars and wolves. These predators associated with the ecosystem change that happened due to logging activities. Also due to warmer temperature, open alpine landscape which is habitat of Vancouver marmots is declining. Thus it’s affect the survival rates and reproductive patterns of this species.
Habitat loss due to changing climate and loss of open alpine landscapes due to global warming has affected the survival rates and reproductive patterns of these marmots. In 2003, the Vancouver marmot population plummeted down to an ever low of only 30 individuals.
Efforts
Conservation authorities in Canada capture wild animals and breed them in captivity to increase their numbers. A large number of animals have been shifted to Toronto Zoo, Vancouver Zoo, and other facilities within the country for captive breeding. The success of this program has led to the increase in the wild marmot population to about 250 to 300.

Photo & Reference
https://www.flickr.com/photos/newmansown/2847203980
https://marmots.org/about-marmots/animal-profile/
http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/12828/0
https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/10-most-threatened-animals-in-north-america.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver_Island_marmot

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