Our Neighborhood's Biodiversity Map

* Please click the continent to see the endangered species of our neighborhood.
South America
Shared by : Luiz Bispo (Brazil)
Region : Brazil
Status : Endangered
History
In 1969 scientists figured out that there were less than 150 individuals of the Gold Lion Tamarin in the Brazilian Tropical Forest “Mata Atlantica”. Due to this fact, in the 70th , the scientist Adelmar Coimbra Filho gathered with the scientific research community and began to be interested in the species conservation. Therefore, he and his team founded a species reproduction institution.
Introduction
The Gold Lion Tamarin is an animal, mammalian, primata, callitrichidae, leontopithecus and rosalia specie. Its habitat is the Brazilian tropical forest “Mata Atlantica” especially in the Rio de Janeiro state.
The species live in family groups of about six member its weight can vary between 550-600 kg height of about 60 cm there is no difference of size and pelage color among male and female life expectancy average of eight years old they can reproduce once or twice per year with 120 days of time gestation and usually twins are born its food diet is based on wild fruits, insects, small vertebrates and eventually tree resin and they have got a diurnal behavior.
Threat
Because of the illegal animal trafficking, zoo keeping, habitat destruction for agriculture, livestock and urban development, the Gold Lion Tamarin has been threaten and under serious risk of being extinct of the Earth.
ECOSYSTEM The main cause of species extinction is deforestation. Relating to this topic, it is possible to say that the Gold Lion Tamarin has an important role in the ecosystem because it has a huge potential for seed dispersion. Therefore, the forest regeneration can get in process which may be essential for other animals surviving.

Sources :
https://www.google.com.br/search?q=mico+leao+dourado&biw=1366&bih=667&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=
X&ei=2e9OVdScMoyfgwToq4C4CQ&ved=0C

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