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Ambassador report

Ambassador report

[Ambassador report] Day 1: Why Rabies is called Rabies?

by Asmita Gaire | 21-09-2020 21:26 Comments 10 Comments recommendations 0 recommendations



Here we begin!

Day 1 
21/09/2020 “Monday” 
#AnOnlineAwarenessCampaign

Why rabies is called rabies?
Is rabies a viral or a bacterial disease and what animals are immune to rabies?

Hydrophobia ("fear of water") is the historic name for rabies. It refers to a set of symptoms in the later stages of an infection. 

1. Rabies is a fatal viral polioencephalitis that specifically affects the gray matter of a dog's brain and the central nervous system (CNS).

2. In the 16th century, an Italian physician Girolamo Fracastoro discovered that rabies was a fatal disease affecting humans as well as animals, calling it "an incurable wound”. However, it was Louis Pasteur a French biologist that created the first vaccine in 1885.

3. Rabies is caused by lyssaviruses, including the rabies virus and Australian bat lyssavirus. 

4. Lyssavirus belongs to the order Mononegavirales, viruses with a nonsegmented, negative-stranded RNA genomes. Within this group, viruses with a distinct “bullet” shape are classified in the Rhabdoviridae family, which includes at least three genera of animal viruses, Lyssavirus, Ephemerovirus, and Vesiculovirus.

5. It is composed of an internal protein core or nucleocapsid, containing the nucleic acid, and an outer envelope, a lipid-containing bilayer covered with transmembrane glycoprotein spikes.

6. It is spread when an infected animal scratches or bites another animal or human. Any mammal can get rabies. The most common wild reservoirs of rabies are raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes.

7. Only mammals can get rabies; birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians do not. Small rodents such as squirrels, hamsters, guinea pigs, gerbils, chipmunks, rats, and mice and lagomorphs like rabbits and hares are almost never found to be infected with rabies and are not known to transmit rabies to humans.

8. Saliva a few days before death when the animal “sheds” the virus, can also transmit rabies if the saliva comes into contact with the eyes, mouth, or nose. 

9. Rabies is not transmitted through the blood, urine or feces of an infected animal, nor is it spread airborne through the open environment.

10. When it reaches the brain, the virus multiplies rapidly and passes to the salivary glands. The animal begins to show signs of the disease.

What are the signs and symptoms of rabies recognized in animals?
To be continued...

#Educate #Vaccinate #Eliminate
#WorldRabiesDay2020

Picture Source: https://images.app.goo.gl/1K5t9kLRsYhUssuf8
https://images.app.goo.gl/1K5t9kLRsYhUssuf8

10 Comments

Asmita Gaire

  • Asmita Gaire says :
    Greetings Mun Woo Joo Mentor
    I hope you are doing well
    Thank you so much for your feedback
    Green cheers
    Kind regards
    Asmita Gaire
    Posted 29-09-2020 01:58

Mun WooJooMentor

  • Mun WooJooMentor says :
    Hello Asmita,
    this is your mentor Woojoo.

    Thank you for such an informative report.
    This is an amazing introduction of Rabies, including the process of infection,
    and I'm eager to read the next one.
    It is surprising that Louis Pasteur was the one who created the first vaccine.
    Louis Pasteur was also the microbiologist who developed Pasteurization, and was the first one to distinguish fermentation and decomposition.

    Keep writing!

    Best wishes,
    WooJoo

    Posted 26-09-2020 00:35

Asmita Gaire

  • Asmita Gaire says :
    Greetings puja sis
    Thank you so much for your feedback
    Green cheers
    Regards
    Asmita Gaire
    Posted 23-09-2020 14:19

Puja Khadka

  • Puja Khadka says :
    Hello Asmita Gaire sister,
    I hope you are doing great.
    Firstly, thank you for sharing very informative article about Rabies.
    Rabies awareness campaign is really effective for moving on the way to eradicate it. Keep writing more and more.
    With Regards,
    Puja Khadka
    Posted 23-09-2020 00:55

Asmita Gaire

  • Asmita Gaire says :
    Greetings dolma
    I hope you are doing
    Thank you so much for your feedback
    Green cheers
    Regards
    Asmita Gaire
    Posted 23-09-2020 00:30

Asmita Gaire

  • Asmita Gaire says :
    Greetings Sandhya sis
    I hope you are doing
    Thank you so much for your feedback
    Green cheers
    Regards
    Asmita Gaire
    Posted 23-09-2020 00:30

Dolma Diki Sherpa

  • Dolma Diki Sherpa says :
    Hello Asmita dd
    Thank you for sharing this information about rabies .
    Keep writing such informative report.
    We are eagerly waiting for next report.
    Regards
    Dolma
    Posted 22-09-2020 16:25

Sandhya Adhikari

  • Sandhya Adhikari says :
    Greeting Sis,
    I do hope you are fine there and staying safe!
    Thank you so much for the informative report on Rabies,
    I was unknown about various facts before,
    Keep sharing informative details with us,

    Warm Regards,
    Sandhya Adhikari

    Green Cheers!!
    Posted 22-09-2020 13:08

Asmita Gaire

  • Asmita Gaire says :
    Greetings Shobha
    I hope you are doing well
    Thank you so much sis for your feedback
    Green cheers
    Regards
    Asmita Gaire
    Posted 22-09-2020 11:54

Shobha Pokhrel

  • Shobha Pokhrel says :
    Hello Asmita sis ,
    IT was really a very infoemative report about rabies .
    Thank u so much for sharing this with us .
    eager to know many more from you .
    keep sharing

    regards ,
    Shobha
    Posted 21-09-2020 22:30

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